So, I’m going to write an anti-self-help book.

Real self-help books promise you that with THE MAGIC OF THINKING BIG you can GET THINGS DONE and you’ll go from GOOD TO GREAT (as long as nobody MOVES your CHEESE…).

Why no books with smaller goals that self-help you into realistic things that you actually need?

  • Manage to Get to the Post Office Before It Closes
  • The Magic of Flossing
  • I Will Teach You to Add Oil to Your Lawnmower

Because, really, don’t you worry that having unrealistic expectations is the OPPOSITE of “dreaming big”—it’s just “setting yourself up to fail”?

“Unrealistic” is different than “big.”

You can have a big dream of touring the world with your ukulele band.

But that’s a very unrealistic dream if you a): don’t have a band and b): can’t play the ukulele.

So…start learning uke today and then you can start putting the band together next week.

And your big dream is suddenly no longer unrealistic.

Hmm. Maybe I don’t need to write a self-help book. I just wrote a self-help paragraph!

I see this all the time with students in my real-world ukulele classes.

They get all excited, practice for a while, then give up.

Why?

Most times it’s because they’re not playing like Jake Shimabukuro quick enough…

When they dreamt of playing uke, they didn’t have in mind the frustration of what it takes to get there.

The little plateaux, getting the fingers to move smoothly, getting two hands moving in coordination.

They saw themselves playing electrified ukulele in a stadium without thinking about what it takes to get there.

And that’s THE MAGIC OF THINKING SMALL.

Just sit down for 5 minutes a day to practice.

Let that be your first goal.

Very small.

Then add little goals on top of that.

  • Like learn the common chords.
  • Master some strum patterns.
  • Combine them to play a song that you love.

And enjoy the success at each step.

Come on, your ukulele is small. Why not make your process small?

That in turn, makes it fun and easy.

One really small step

you could take is to invest in a program like “Defeat the E.” If you’ve already learned the easy chords, maybe it’s time to learn the hard ones!

And guess what?

You can do that at this link here.

Your tiny little pal,
Danno

PS: If you have ever struggled with E chord on ukulele (or D or E-flat, which are similar), then this is course you should get. Click here.

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